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PPS®5000, Stationary Plasma Thruster

PPS5000 cropped

PPS®5000

Safran Spacecraft Propulsion

Stable operation over a wide power range: 2,500 to 5,000 W

Wide operating temperature range: -65°C / 310°C

Reduced beam divergence 40°

The PPS®5000 plasma thruster is purpose-designed for “all-electric” satellites. It can operate in high-thrust or high specific impulse mode, and offers an operating lifespan of about 15,000 hours. This means it can handle orbital positioning and stationkeeping duties for a wide range of telecom and navigation satellites, as well as exploration spacecraft. The PPS®5000 was fully qualified in 2021.

PPS®5000

Safran Spacecraft Propulsion

Stable operation over a wide power range: 2,500 to 5,000 W

Wide operating temperature range: -65°C / 310°C

Reduced beam divergence 40°

Designed for orbit raising and station-keeping

40% weight savings versus conventional propulsion

Excellent thrust-to-electrical power ratio

Orbital welding

Safran Spacecraft Propulsion, a major player in plasma propulsion

Safran Spacecraft Propulsion, a subsidiary of Safran Electronics & Defense, is the European leader in plasma propulsion. Safran Spacecraft Propulsion offers a complete range of electric motors and propulsion subsystems for more sustainable satellites and spacecraft. Plasma propulsion has become the go-to solution for satellite positioning, orbital transfer and stationkeeping, because it offers significant weight savings over conventional chemical propulsion. Bombarding atoms from the fuel (usually xenon) with electrons creates a plasma ejected at high speed to provide propulsion with very high specific impulse (propulsive efficiency).

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  • © Safran
  • © Safran Spacecraft Propulsion
  • © Philippe Stroppa / Safran