Environment

In response to the climate challenge, Safran is conducting an ambitious policy to allow it to contribute to a transition to carbon-neutral aviation by 2050. New engine architectures, sustainable fuels, aircraft featuring hybrid and more electric technology: these strategies for reinventing the aeronautics industry of tomorrow are already being implemented by the Group. In addition, Safran has undertaken to limit the greenhouse gas emissions of its operations, production sites and value chain. Decarbonizing aviation is one of the four pillars of the Group’s CSR strategy.

In response to the climate challenge, Safran is conducting an ambitious policy to allow it to contribute to a transition to carbon-neutral aviation by 2050. New engine architectures, sustainable fuels, aircraft featuring hybrid and more electric technology: these strategies for reinventing the aeronautics industry of tomorrow are already being implemented by the Group. In addition, Safran has undertaken to limit the greenhouse gas emissions of its operations, production sites and value chain. Decarbonizing aviation is one of the four pillars of the Group's CSR strategy.

 

 

 

 

75%
of our R&T expenses focus on improving the environmental impact of our products
-30%
Safran is aiming to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 30% by 2025 compared with 2018*

*direct greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the Group's energy consumption (scopes 1 and 2)

 

Towards "low-carbon" aircraft

To meet the European Union's goal of net zero carbon emissions for aviation by 2050, Safran plays an active role in the preliminary development of low-carbon aircraft, which could be introduced toward 2030-2035. These aircraft will feature ultra-efficient engines and aerodynamic designs, while also significantly reducing weight and offering full compatibility with sustainable aviation fuels (SAF) and an optimized electrical power system. We have already been working for a number of years on new engine architectures such as the Open Rotor, an unshrouded gas turbine engine with two counter-rotating fans, designed to reduce CO2 emissions by 20% versus current powerplants. A number of technologies are being applied to reduce aircraft weight and therefore fuel consumption, including composite materials, additive manufacturing and the electrification of aircraft systems.

 

 

 

 

Supporting the introduction of sustainable fuels

Decarbonizing aviation will depend on the use of sustainable fuels, such as biofuels from biomass or synthetic fuels, with a complete lifecycle that significantly reduces their carbon footprint. Liquid hydrogen is also being considered as a fuel, because it eliminates CO2 emissions in flight. However, all of these options would require significant changes from current aircraft design, and therefore a stronger partnership between Safran and aircraft manufacturers.

 

 

 

 

Developing electric propulsion and hybrid aircraft

All-electric propulsion is not in the cards for mainline aircraft for the moment because of the excessive weight of batteries. However, electric power is already being used or under study for a number of other aircraft systems. At Safran, we already invest heavily in research, most notably via partnerships with specialized startups, to make maximum use of the electric power available on current aircraft. One likely solution to meet energy efficiency targets for upcoming generations of commercial aircraft is a hybrid system, entailing an electric propulsion system used in conjunction with conventional thermal propulsion, along with increased electrification of secondary functions. We have carved out a leadership role in hybrid and all-electric architectures, thanks to our proven expertise in all aspects of aircraft electrical systems. We are already working with various manufacturers on different projects, including the EcoPulse distributed hybrid propulsion demonstrator with Daher and Airbus, and vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) concepts.

 

 

 

 

"Low carbon" strategy implemented at all sites

Since 2018, Safran has been implementing a plan to reduce its carbon emissions. This "low-carbon" project covers all activities directly or indirectly related to product manufacturing. In 2021, Safran revised its low-carbon objectives with an even more ambitious target: a 30% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2025 compared to 2018. Programs are already in place in all of the Group's sites to meet these objectives, such as, for instance, lowering our energy consumption, developing an Internal Carbon Price (ICP), which assigns a monetary value to harmful emissions, and using sustainable fuels for engine testing.

 

 

 

 

REACH: a worldwide standard

La gestion des substances dangereuses et leur substitution sont fondamentales pour Safran. Le Groupe applique ainsi scrupuleusement les réglementations, et s'appuie sur une organisation dédiée. Instauré en Europe il y a dix ans, le règlement REACH vise à protéger l'homme et l'environnement contre les risques liés aux substances chimiques. Safran se focalise sur le respect et l'application de réglementation REACH pour gérer la toxicité ou l'écotoxicité des substances et des matériaux utilisés tout au long du cycle de vie de ses produits. Le Groupe s'implique également activement dans l'International Aerospace Environmental Group qui vise à mettre en place des solutions innovantes en matière environnementale et en particulier sur la gestion et la substitution des substances dangereuses.

 

 

 

> Credits
© Adrien Daste / Safran
© Adrien Daste / Safran
© Sankai / 2018 iStockphoto
© Raphael Soret / Safran
© PepperBox / Safran
© Adrien Daste / Safran
© Adrien Daste / Safran
© Chris Bergin / CAPA Pictures / Safran
© Chris Bergin / CAPA Pictures / Safran
© Cyril Abad / CAPA Pictures / Safran
© Adrien Daste / Safran
© Adrien Daste / Safran
© Cyril Abad / CAPA Pictures / Safran
© Adrien Daste / Safran
© Adrien Daste / Safran
© AleksandarNakic / 2018 iStockphoto
© Thierry Mamberti / Safran
© ADAC Luftrettung / Theo Klein

 

Hit enter to search or ESC to close